News

Organic nanoparticles offer 'complete package' against cancer: delivery and imaging

Nanoparticles come in many shapes and sizes, each specifically designed to play a precise role in cancer treatment. And now, researchers from UC Davis have created nanotechnology with the ability to perform multiple tasks and the ultimate goal of destroying tumors.

Vascular device drug delivery company surpasses VC goal

Advanced Catheter Therapies' venture capital funding round has been oversubscribed, reflecting investor interest in the company's Occlusion Perfusion Catheter for localized drug delivery in the peripheral vasculature.

PharmaJet secures FDA approval for jet injection system for flu vaccine

The FDA has approved the first needle-free delivery system for the inactivated flu vaccine. The jet injector, made by Pennsylvania-based PharmaJet, has been shown to successfully provide vaccination without a needle jab, which could ultimately help improve vaccination rates.

Louisiana Tech researchers use 3-D printing to create bioresorbable drug delivery system

Researchers at Louisiana Tech University say they have harnessed 3-D printing for drug delivery by fabricating bioresorbable filaments enabling targeted delivery of antibiotics or chemotherapeutics.

Russian scientists close in on drug-delivering nanorobots

Researchers at the Institute of General Physics at the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology said their advancement in biocomputing using nanoparticles is a step towards creating drug-delivering nanorobots.

 

Alnylam receives more good news on the IP front

Alnylam Pharmaceuticals received a Notice of Allowance from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for an application granting the company new claims to RNA interference medicines.

Hydrogel enables longer graft survival in hand, leg transplant patients

Researchers successfully delivered the immunosuppressant tacrolimus in a self-assembled hydrogel, enabling localized therapy in patients receiving a tissue graft transplant of the leg, hand or face.

Mist formulation of Boehringer Ingelheim's COPD inhaler gets advisory committee nod

The FDA's Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee voted 10-3 to recommend approval of Boehringer Ingelheim's mist formulation of its dry-powder inhalable treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Study finds blood-brain barrier opening can be controlled, enabling enhanced drug delivery

Columbia University scientists showed that it is possible to control the size of the blood-brain barrier opening by varying the pressure of an ultrasound beam, a discovery that could herald major breakthroughs in the treatment of neurological diseases.

Scientists uncover new drug delivery method using nanosecond lasers and carbon nanotubes

Engineers and cell biologists have long used pulsed lasers to stimulate cells for gene transfection, drug injection or the regulation of gene expression. Now, Japanese scientists uncovered a new, potentially less-expensive method of delivering drugs and manipulating genes of individual cells by pairing nanosecond laser energy with carbon nanotubes.

Arrowhead updates TheStreet on clinical trial results of RNAi candidate for hepatitis B

Arrowhead Research reported on Aug. 12 that patients in its Phase II clinical trial of the ARC-520 RNA interference candidate for hepatitis B had a "similar" knockdown to those reported in primate studies. The stock price fell at the very end of the trading day to close at $12.00 from an opening-day price of $13.00.

Sharp rise in opioid abuse may benefit drug delivery contenders

The contenders to develop new methods of tackling the problem of opioid addiction should receive a boost from a new study by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, which found that the overuse of pain medications has resulted in a 5% average annual increase in adult hospital stays between 1993 and 2012.

Can insect venom be harnessed to fight cancer?

A bioengineering professor says he has developed nanoparticles that can carry cancer-fighting insect toxins directly to tumors, sparing the rest of the body from nasty side effects, including damage to the heart, bleeding underneath the skin and unwanted clotting.

Medicated electrospun fabric offers alternative delivery method for HIV-preventing drugs

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a medicated, electrospun fabric that could prevent HIV infections in women.

pH-sensing capsules that deliver optimal quantity of insulin under development

Researchers say they successfully tested in mice a molecular implant that contains gene-based mechanisms for delivering insulin based on feedback from an associated pH biosensor. By maintaining a healthy pH level between 7.35 and 7.45, the therapy, consisting of different genes and proteins, would prevent potentially fatal metabolic shock (ketoacidosis) in diabetics. 

Oraya receives NIH grant to study use of its novel eye radiation tech against cancer

Ophthalmology company Oraya Therapeutics will collaborate with researchers from Boston's Dana-Farber Cancer Institute to study applications of its novel radiation therapy against cancer when used in conjunction with gold nanoparticles.

BioDelivery Sciences International to add 80 patients to clinical trial of Clonidine Topical Gel

BioDelivery Sciences International announced today that it will add about 80 patients to its Phase III pivotal trial of Clonidine Topical Gel for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy.

BD launches AutoShield Duo pen for diabetics

Becton, Dickinson and Company today announced that its BD AutoShield Duo pen for the delivery of insulin and diabetes drugs is now available in retail pharmacies. 

Thin and strong, graphene sheets form spheres spontaneously for drug release

Graphene is one of the thinnest and strongest known materials and has been used in drug delivery before. But the Nobel Prize-winning material could get another lease on life with a new discovery from Monash University in Australia that could make graphene an important drug release component.

Carnegie Mellon team creates self-assembling nanofibers for shaped delivery vehicles

Polymer nanomaterials are crucial for many types of drug delivery applications, offering the flexibility and durability needed to engineer specific shapes and sizes for particular delivery solutions. Now, at Carnegie Mellon, researchers have developed a new technique for creating self-assembling fibers for this purpose, taking a cue from the natural fibers in living cells.